Dismantling SAIC

I was surprised to read in today’s Washington Post that SAIC has decided to sell off the Tysons headquarters complex. It appears to me that SAIC is being dismantled piece by piece in anticipation of the split into two separate companies.

Depending on the terms of the sale, there will likely be a short-term boost to the bottom line of both SAIC and Leidos which may help ease the transition to two companies, at least in the eyes of shareholders. This boost won’t last. The present dismemberment of SAIC is a great disappointment to me; it is very difficult for me to watch.

– Bob


12 Responses to “Dismantling SAIC”

  1. 1 Lynette Taravella

    I, too, was surprised when I found out SAIC sold Tysons Corner from my husband, Tony who worked at Campus Point. He was laid off from the Security department on 4/26 after 24 years at SAIC. He provided excellent service with a smile. We both agree that things changed at SAIC after your departure. Lastly, we both agree that splitting up the company is a bad idea.

  2. 2 keith nightingale

    Bob;

    This situation highlights what I have always known, that you are greater than the sum of the parts and that is both a blessing and a curse. I was exceedingly fortunate to become associated with you when I left the military but more importantly, to gain the insights into the true quality potential of personal leadership.

    In my life, I have been able to see the Good, the Bad and the Ugly in both the Military and the Commercial worlds and you were definitely THE Good in our universe. (You recall our Planet Chart…). I have briefed and discoursed with Presidents, Senators, Executives and Soldiers and in my own way, made judgments as have others exposed to your character and direction.

    Your successors hold titles but not the honor of place. I was exceedingly fortunate in my time at SAIC. I know from personal observation and in moments of import, you always made the correct and deeply personal choices that were for the betterment of us all. This is a gift that is unfortunately ephemeral as your successors have proven.

    There are a large number of us, many younger than I, who will have taken lessons from your example and will know how to grow something of value that permits its participants to be part of something greater than the sum of its parts. That is your lasting legacy.

    This is not a trivial thing and it has been most important for me and virtually all of us that have known you. Whatever good emerges from the present direction will always have your stamp.

    Thankyou,

    Keith

  3. 3 Dr. Beyster

    Keith: It’s nice to hear from you. You bailed me out a lot of times when I was running SAIC. I hope you’re doing well. Please keep me informed on your latest goings on. — Bob

  4. 4 Dr. Beyster

    Lynette: Of course I agree with you because I believe the company should not be divided. We had a unique culture that worked well. Why split it up? — Bob

  5. 5 Chris G.

    Dr. Beyster,

    I agree with entirely. The last decade of SAIC since you left has been a methodical removal of everything that was great about the company. I started with the company less than a year before you left, but I remember learning and studying everything about the company during the orientation process. You can take heart that many have taken your legacy and attempted to replicate it. I did this myself when I left the company last November to launch my own employee-owned company. I don’t expect to do as well as you did, but hopefully I can create an environment that at least resembles the one you created.

    Thanks for leading a great company and demonstrating to others how a great company can be set up and managed.

    Chris G.

  6. 6 Dr. Beyster

    Chris G: Thank you for your post on my blog. I am glad to hear that you have started your own company based on some of the things you learned at SAIC. Please be sure to contact the FED (www.fed.org) and the Beyster Institute (http://rady.ucsd.edu/beyster) for assistance with your business. They are active in promoting employee ownership and small business technology innovation. Good luck in your efforts. — Bob

  7. 7 Barbara Maccallum

    Dismantling SAIC is such an appropriate description of what is happening. I joined SAIC in June of 1995 and watched the company flourish until you left. The changes that have been happening since then make my head spin!

    Selling off company assets and shedding talented employees all in the name of cutting costs may well be the demise of the new SAIC and Leidos. It is sad to see all that you worked so hard for being torn apart. Come October I will be joining the ranks of those employees who have been laid off since you left. Oh how I miss the old days when it really was fun to come to work! Thank you for the great years we had.

    Barb

  8. 8 Dr. Beyster

    Barbara: Sorry to hear that you are going to be laid off. I wish you well in finding a new job. — Bob

  9. 9 Christina B

    Dr. Beyster,

    I joined SAIC in Sept 1995 and enjoyed an incredible career. It was an exciting time to be an employee owner. I even got a chance to shake your hand as a 21st Century Leadership participant.

    It is very difficult to watch all the changes over the past few years, not just a dismantling of a company but a dismantling of a culture – a culture that cared about its people like family, and did anything needed to take care of our customers. I resigned last week and will be doing some consulting for a small company.

    I have fond memories of my days at SAIC, particularly those from my first 10 years with the company. If I work for a larger firm in the future, I will be looking for an employee owned company!

    Thank you for all you did for SAIC, for the culture you created, and for your continued advocacy for employee ownership!

    Chris

  10. 10 Dr. Beyster

    Christina: Thank you for your post on my blog. I am glad to hear you have fond memories of SAIC — I do too. I hope you will carry our unique culture with you to your new employer, and keep the spirit alive. — Bob

  11. 11 Marat Oyvetsky

    Dr. Beyster,
    I began working for SAIC in 2003. Through many years, advanced degrees in engineering and business as well as 5 point yearly reviews, I enjoyed working for such a large, dynamic and challenging company. My father-in-law to this day is still an employee of SAIC and has been employed by SAIC for nearly 33 years. Although, he is with Leidos now due to the split.
    After my last 5 point review in April of 2013, I was told that I was being laid off. Although I instantly found a new position, it was outside of the company that I very much wanted to remain a part of.
    I just wanted to say thank you. Thank you for building such a dynamic company. Thank you for building a company that not only was incredibly competitive, but also took care of the performers that gave to the company as much as the company gave back to them. Your legacy lives in our experience.

    Kindest Regards,
    –Marat Oyvetsky

  12. 12 Dr. Beyster

    Marat: Thank you and your father-in-law for your many years of service to SAIC. We all built the company together, and you are an important part of SAIC’s legacy. Thank you. — Bob

Leave a Reply





Add to Google Homepage or Google Feed Reader
What is RSS?
Receive email alerts

August 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031


Recent Posts


Recent Comments

  • Dr. Beyster: Jim: Thank you for the birthday wishes — it was good to hear from you. — Bob
  • Dr. Beyster: Ron: Your story about the Grand Canyon and the lone telephone on a pole made me laugh. Thank you for...
  • Ron Parkinson: Bob, reminders of your birthday reached us a bit late here in Cuenca, but Jolene and I want to...
  • Jim Barber: Bob, Happy Birthday! All the best to you and your family. Jim Barber
  • Dr. Beyster: Eugene: Thank you very much for the 90th birthday wishes — it’s good to hear from you. I...